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Publish on October 4, 2021 on
Pathway 2 to Sustainable Fat Loss: Optimized Self-Importance


You are important. Your health, well-being, enjoyment of your body and sense of physicality are important.

If you deny your own importance, you will simply not succeed in your fat loss goals. Similarly, if you overinflate your sense of self-importance, you will likely alienate yourself from the people and the possibilities you are trying to create with your changing body. 

In a sense, this plays back into the idea of triage. After realizing that fat loss is a healthy, meaningful goal for you, you can then prioritize which measures (and what degree of them) you ought to take in order to achieve it. Done with a sense of self-importance that acknowledges both that you are absolutely worth that achievement and that it is counterproductive to work towards it so hard that it causes you to lose what you find most meaningful, you can pave a successful, sustainable path towards your fat loss goal.

Does your family have a movie night once a week that includes pizza and buttery popcorn? Awesome! No need to eliminate it or eliminate yourself from it. Some mild adjustments (if any) will likely do. Do you have a weekly outing with work colleagues for drinks and appetizers? Great! Keep participating in it, and perhaps make a couple of modifications. Is Christmas or some other holiday celebration nearing and threatening to knock you off-course? It is possible to enjoy the holidays and still keep engaged in your fat loss process.

Events, rituals and special occasions with the people that mean the most to us are essential to life enjoyment. When engaging in fat loss,, it is important to be careful not to edit ourselves out of those opportunities via extreme measures. This is especially true given that oftentimes such extreme measures and levels of self-importance lead to equally extreme self-deflation and reversion to undesirable habits. This leads nicely into our next topic . . . 

(Click here to read the next part of this blog series)

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