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Exercise // Thinker: 3 Practical Tips to (re)Start Exercising Better Than Ever (Tip 3)

The final tip in this series flies right in the face of popular exercise thinking.


This is difficult for me. I dislike confrontation. But, I dislike lying via omission even more.


We want continual betterment when it comes to our exercise, and we tend to equate "more" with better.


More weight. More sets. More time.


Maybe there is some merit to that. When "more" is added via autopiloted processes, though, all thinking is absent. This sets us up for failure temporary success, but all likely failure in the long run.


Try on some consistency.


Tip 3: Consistency Beats Intensity . . . Every. Single. Time.


This is especially true if you are in the early stages of your exercise process.


However, the wisest and most experienced exercisers are likely to both agree with this principle and carry it with them in their own exercise.


For a moment, let's pretend that you have a handle on an intensity level that you can manage. You are FAR better off exercising at that level of effort until it no longer seems intense, and then AND ONLY then adding to it with a minimally effective nudge.


Embodying the idea that more intensity of effort automatically equals better exercise can make exercise the cause rather than the cure for your pain, and I mean pain in the most holistic way possible.


You're not at the gym to be entertained. Be willing to get bored; seek entertainment elsewhere.


Add more when it is appropriate and meaningful to do so.


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